The lady doth protest too much methinks

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the lady doth protest too much methinks

Quote by William Shakespeare: “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

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Published 02.10.2019

Michele Bachmann Tries Fails To Quote Shakespeare During House Debate

"The lady doth protest too much, methinks" is a line from the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare. It is spoken by Queen Gertrude in response to the insincere.

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

It is spoken by Queen Gertrude in response to the insincere overacting of a character in the play within a play created by Prince Hamlet to prove his uncle's guilt in the murder of his father, the King of Denmark. The phrase is used in everyday speech to indicate doubt concerning someone's sincerity. A common misquotation places methinks first, as in "methinks the lady doth protest too much". The line, like most of Shakespeare's works, is in iambic pentameter. Hamlet believes that his father, the king, was murdered by his uncle Claudius who then married Gertrude.

Danish march. A Flourish. Enter a King and a Queen, very lovingly; the Queen embracing him, and he her. She kneels, and makes show of protestation unto him. He takes her up, and declines his head upon her neck; lays him down upon a bank of flowers: she, seeing him asleep, leaves him. The Queen returns, finds the King dead, and makes passionate action.

In simple words, her vows are too artful, too elaborate, or too insistent to be true. More cynically, Gertrude may imply that such affirmations are silly, and this may indirectly defend her own situation or remarriage. For whatever the reason, people switch this phrase around a lot these days. Though it does not mean exactly what Shakespeare used this phrase for, it is used in the sense that someone is denying or objecting to something too much. In the play, Gertrude says that the lady avows so much that she loses her reliability and credibility. Today, it is said that, if someone objects too much, he loses his credibility. Thus, people generally use it ironically when somebody tries to affirm too much.

The quote "The lady doth protest too much" is from Shakespeare's Hamlet. than the misquotation (thanks to the delayed "methinks") and much more ironic.
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Hamlet by: William Shakespeare. Act 3 Scene 2. To desperation turn my trust and hope. Each opposite that blanks the face of joy. Meet what I would have well and it destroy.

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From the quotation "The lady doth protest too much, methinks. Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary. English Wikipedia has an article on: the lady doth protest too much. Serbo-Croatian: please add this translation if you can Spanish: please verify la dama protesta mucho Ukrainian: please add this translation if you can Welsh: yr euog a ffy heb neb yn ei erlid. Categories : English lemmas English phrases English terms with quotations English terms first attested in Shakespeare. Hidden categories: Quotation templates to be cleaned Requests for translations into Danish Requests for review of French translations Requests for review of Italian translations Requests for review of Portuguese translations Requests for review of Russian translations Requests for translations into Serbo-Croatian Requests for review of Spanish translations Requests for translations into Ukrainian.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Jiggtoulama1963 says:

    From the SparkNotes Blog

  2. Amalie C. says:

    No Fear Shakespeare: Hamlet: Act 3 Scene 2 Page 10

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